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The Docket - February 2013

titleThe Docket - The Newsletter of the Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association </p> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width: 972px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="left" style="width: 972px;"> <tbody> <tr style="line-height: 0px;"> <td style="line-height: 0px;"><img src="images/newsletter/newsletter_r1_c1.jpg" border="0" width="610" height="49" /></td> <td style="line-height: 0px;"><img src="images/newsletter/gradient_repeat.jpg" border="0" width="20" height="49" /></td> <td style="line-height: 0px;" width="342"><img src="images/newsletter/newsletter_r1_c5.jpg" border="0" width="342" height="49" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="left" style="width: 972px;"> <tbody> <tr style="line-height: 0px;"> <td style="line-height: 0px;" width="262"><img src="images/newsletter/logo_top.jpg" border="0" width="262" height="88" /></td> <td style="line-height: 0px;" width="5"><img src="images/newsletter/newsletter_r2_c3.jpg" border="0" width="494" height="88" /></td> <td style="line-height: 0px;"><img src="images/newsletter/newsletter_r2_c6.jpg" width="216" height="88" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="left" style="width: 972px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="left" style="width: 240px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="5" cellpadding="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000;"><span face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;" data-mce-mark="1">February 2013<br /> <br /></span></h2> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">{joomlacontent:47|type:intro|pict:0}</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="left" style="width: 732px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="5" cellpadding="5" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000; text-align: center;"><a href="{readonline|template:standard}{/readonline}" target="_blank" style="text-decoration: none;"><span class="acymailing_online" data-mce-mark="1"></span></a><a href="{readonline|template:standard}{/readonline}" target="_blank" style="text-decoration: none;"><span class="acymailing_online" data-mce-mark="1">If you are having problems viewing the contents of this newsletter, please click here.</span></a></p> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000;"> <p>{autocontent:21-|max:20|order:ordering,ASC|type:full|pict:1}</p> </div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;" data-mce-mark="1">Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association<br /><a href="http://edwba.org">www.edwba.org</a><br /> 424 East Wells Street<br /> Milwaukee, WI 53202</span></p> </td> <td align="center"> <p align="right"><span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;" data-mce-mark="1">Executive Director<br /> Katy Borowski<br /> 414-276-5933<br /><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy37365 = 'kborowski' + '@'; addy37365 = addy37365 + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; var addy_text37365 = 'kborowski' + '@' + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy37365 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text37365); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" align="center" valign="middle" style="background-image: url('images/newsletter/newsletter_r7_c1.jpg'); background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; -webkit-background-clip: initial; -webkit-background-origin: initial; background-color: initial;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;" data-mce-mark="1"> {modify}Modify your Subscription{/modify}</span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <div class="item-separator"></div> </div> </div> <div class="items-row cols-2 row-0"> <div class="item column-1"> <h2> The Docket - March 2012 </h2> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" /> <style type="text/css"><!-- h1{text-transform:uppercase;} --></style> <title style="font-size: 24px; line-height: 28.8px">titleThe Docket - The Newsletter of the Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="972"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="972" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r1_c1.jpg" border="0" width="610" height="49" /></td> <td><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/gradient_repeat.jpg" border="0" width="20" height="49" /></td> <td width="342"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r1_c5.jpg" border="0" width="342" height="49" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="972" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td width="262"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/logo_top.jpg" border="0" width="262" height="88" /></td> <td width="5"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r2_c3.jpg" border="0" width="494" height="88" /></td> <td><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r2_c6.jpg" width="216" height="88" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="972" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="240" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="5" cellpadding="0" width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">March 2012<br /> <br /> </span></h2></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <div> <h3 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 18px; color: #000000"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><b>EDWBA Leadership</b></span></h3> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Executive Committee</b> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>President</b><br /> Matthew W. O’Neill<br /> Fox, O’Neill & Shannon<br /> 414-273-3939<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy10650 = 'mwoneill' + '@'; addy10650 = addy10650 + 'foslaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text10650 = 'mwoneill' + '@' + 'foslaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy10650 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text10650); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>President Elect</b><br /> Allen C. Schlinsog, Jr.<br /> Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren<br /> 414-298-1000<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy78568 = 'aschlins' + '@'; addy78568 = addy78568 + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text78568 = 'aschlins' + '@' + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy78568 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text78568); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Vice President</b><br /> Anthony S. Baish<br /> Godfrey & Kahn<br /> 414-273-5198<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy6934 = 'aschlins' + '@'; addy6934 = addy6934 + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text6934 = 'tbaish' + '@' + 'gklaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy6934 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text6934); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Secretary</b><br /> Barbara J. Janaszek<br /> Whyte Hirschboeck Dudek<br /> 414-978-5447<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy63110 = 'bjanaszek' + '@'; addy63110 = addy63110 + 'whdlaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text63110 = 'bjanaszek' + '@' + 'whdlaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy63110 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text63110); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Treasurer</b><br /> Sandra R. Gegios<br /> U.S. District Court Eastern District<br /> 414-297-3071<br /> <a href="http://edwba.org/<script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy1978 = 'sandra_gegios' + '@'; addy1978 = addy1978 + 'wied' + '.' + 'uscourts' + '.' + 'gov'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy1978 + '\'>'); document.write(addy1978); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script>"><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy37023 = 'Sandra_gegios' + '@'; addy37023 = addy37023 + 'wied' + '.' + 'uscourts' + '.' + 'gov'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy37023 + '\'>'); document.write(addy37023); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script></a> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Past President</b><br /> G. Michael Halfenger<br /> Foley & Lardner<br /> 414-297-5547<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy58593 = 'mhalfenger' + '@'; addy58593 = addy58593 + 'foleyc' + '.' + 'om'; var addy_text58593 = 'mhalfenger' + '@' + 'foleyc' + '.' + 'om'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy58593 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text58593); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Program Co-chairs</b><br /> Scott W. Hansen<br /> Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren<br /> 414-298-8123<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy42129 = 'shansen' + '@'; addy42129 = addy42129 + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text42129 = 'shansen' + '@' + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy42129 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text42129); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Elizabeth C. Perkins<br /> Quarles & Brady<br /> 414-277-5763<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy14629 = 'Elizabeth.perkins' + '@'; addy14629 = addy14629 + 'quarles' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text14629 = 'Elizabeth.perkins' + '@' + 'quarles' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy14629 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text14629); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <br /> <b>Board of Directors</b><br /> Paul E. Benson<br /> Melinda Hein Bialzik<br /> Jennifer L. Bolger<br /> Mark A. Cameli<br /> Jennifer C. Hong<br /> Joseph D. Kearney<br /> Jonathan H. Koenig<br /> Laura Schulteis Kwaterski<br /> Eric L. Maassen<br /> Cassandra H. McCauley<br /> Timothy F. Nixon<br /> T. Wickham Schmidt<br /> Jan A. Smokowicz<br /> Julie P. Wilson </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Ex-Officio Board Members</b><br /> Hon. Charles N. Clevert, Jr.<br /> Terri L. Full<br /> Hon. Patricia J. Gorence<br /> Hon. William C. Griesbach<br /> Hon. Nancy Joseph<br /> Hon. Elsa C. Lamelas<br /> Hon. Margaret Dee McGarity<br /> Janet L. Medlock<br /> Hon. Pamela Pepper<br /> Hon. Rudolph T. Randa<br /> Jon Sanfilippo<br /> Hon. J.P. Stadtmueller<br /> Donald J. Wall </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>President’s Council</b><br /> William J. Mulligan<br /> Kathleen S. Donius<br /> Daniel T. Flaherty<br /> Scott J. Campbell<br /> Robert L. Gegios<br /> Kathy L. Nusslock<br /> Cristina D. Hernandez </p> <br /> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Committee Chairs</b> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Bankruptcy</b><br /> Bruce G. Arnold<br /> Peter C. Blain </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Civil</b><br /> Melinda Hein Bialzik<br /> Mark A. Peterson </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Criminal</b><br /> Christopher D. Donovan<br /> Jonathan H. Koenig </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Membership</b><br /> Mark A. Cameli </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Newsletter</b><br /> Laura Schulteis Kwaterski<br /> Julie P. Wilson </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Pro Bono</b><br /> Jennifer C. Hong<br /> Maria L. Kreiter </p> <h3 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> </h3></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="732" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="5" cellpadding="5" width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000; text-align: center">   </p> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000">A Lesson Learned from a Great Bankruptcy Judge</h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Thomas L. Shriner, Jr.</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012winter/Ihlenfeldt030_300.jpg" alt="Ihlenfeldt" width="300" height="267" align="right" />*This article is from the Marquette University Law School Faculty Blog. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Judge Dale Ihlenfeldt died right after Christmas. He was 92 years old and hadn’t sat on the bankruptcy court bench in Milwaukee for many years, though he remained active until fairly recently, including by teaching an annual CLE program in Madison in which I also participate. Teaching CLE required him to keep up on developments in bankruptcy law, and that suited him just fine, because he loved the law. He also liked lawyers, and his warm, engaging personality was always welcome whenever he could join us. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> I learned a lot from Judge Ihlenfeldt over the years, but one of the most valuable lessons he taught me came very early in my legal career, and I see this story as making an important point for law students and new lawyers. The practice of law requires constant learning; you’ve barely begun to know what you need to know when you leave law school. And you can - must - learn the lessons of the law (and life) from everyone, not just your professors, but your colleagues, your adversaries, your clients, and even from judges. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Back in the mid ’70s, as an associate at Foley & Lardner, I first appeared in bankruptcy court for banks and other creditors, often seeking to recover collateral or to oppose the discharge of a debt. I had appeared before Judge Ihlenfeldt a few times, and on this particular occasion he had ruled against me. I don’t remember the details, but the decision may well have involved the judge’s exercising some discretion, and he exercised it against my client. The case was over, and (as often happened in his court) the lawyers had lingered in chambers to talk. He could tell that I was upset at losing (not then having much experience at it—a condition that time has healed), and he turned to me, in his gentle way, and said, “Oh, Tom, you have to understand that we’re the<i> bankruptcy</i> court. Bankruptcy law is intended to benefit debtors, and you shouldn't expect to win all the time when you represent creditors.” </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> This comment struck me at the time and many times since as one of the best lessons that a judge could teach a young lawyer. And it has implications beyond bankruptcy law. Good judges like Judge Ihlenfeldt call them as they see them and follow the law as they understand it. But a lawyer should never lose sight of the fact that much of the law (understood as being what judges do) is not black and white, but gray, and a judge’s instincts in the gray area—whether to afford a debtor relief, to let a plaintiff try to prove her case, or to cut a lawyer some slack—are every bit as much a part of the law as the stuff in the books. I’m glad that I learned that lesson early from a great judge.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> A Memorial Service will be held for Judge Ihlenfeldt on Monday, May 14 at the Federal Courthouse. More tributes to Judge Ihlenfeldt will appear in the next edition of The Docket. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000">Winning from the Beginning</h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Laurna Jozwiak</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> On Wednesday, February 22, 2012, members of the EDWBA were privileged to attend “Winning from the Beginning: Building a Winning Case from Complaint to Closing Argument,” presented by Judge Pamela Pepper.  Judge Pepper’s program and advice was insightful, humorous, interactive and - most importantly – extremely practical.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> While Judge Pepper has served as a United States Bankruptcy Court Judge since 2005, the information she presented was in no way particular to bankruptcy practitioners.  Judge Pepper called upon her time and experience as an Assistant United States Attorney, a criminal defense attorney and, most importantly for EDWBA members, a Judge in the Eastern District, to develop an outline of how to effectively manage litigation, from initial client meeting through the close of trial. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The impetus for the program was, unfortunately for practitioners, a discussion Judge Pepper recalled having with her colleagues.  She found that they were often left asking themselves “Is that everything?” at the close of the plaintiff’s case or at the end of trial.  Regrettably for those of us practicing in the Eastern District, that answer was often "yes." A common reason for dismissal was that plaintiff’s counsel failed to prove (or in egregious cases, even discuss) an element of their client’s claim.  In an effort to assist attorneys in avoiding problems such as these, Judge Pepper developed her “Winning from the Beginning” approach to case development, focusing on the importance of a well-drafted complaint. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> In demonstrating her strategy for success, Judge Pepper took participants step-by-step through the process of developing a case, from the first client interview through closing statements.  She emphasized the importance of thinking of the case as a “single entity,” and how that perspective helps attorneys to hone in on critical information necessary to achieve results for your client.  Her materials laid out a thoughtful roadmap for attorneys to use in developing, proving, and ultimately succeeding in their client’s causes of action. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> While the program was bursting with helpful, handy, step-by-step advice, what follows are some of "Judge Pepper's to dos" applicable to all attorneys when drafting and later using a complaint to guide litigation: </p> <ol> <li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">Know the law. State the law clearly. Your complaint should lay out each element of every cause of action specifically.</li> <li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">Know the facts.  Interview the client yourself. Interview your client more than once.  Make sure that you have evidence that directly supports each element of your causes of action.  If you do not have the evidence when you file your case, make sure that you reasonably believe that you can obtain the necessary evidence.  If you do not, do not move forward with that cause of action.  Know which facts are important.  Eliminate extraneous information, and avoid reciting a litany of “bad acts” that does not further your client’s position.</li> <li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">Narrow your causes of action. Be creative when brainstorming, and discriminating in your final determination of how to proceed.  Avoid “kitchen sink” drafting at the outset, and focus on those causes of action you can support with the evidence you have or know you can obtain.</li> <li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">Determine what you really want.  Be sure that there is a basis in the law for the relief that you are seeking.  Make sure that you have proved up everything you need in order for your client to be entitled to that relief.</li> <li style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">Refer to the complaint <u>often</u>.  A carefully-drafted complaint should serve as an invaluable tool to any litigator.  Use the complaint to draft discovery.  Allow the complaint to guide settlement negotiations.  Analyze whether a summary judgment motion is appropriate in light of the facts set out in the complaint.  Prepare for trial using your complaint as an outline.  Draft closing arguments centered on the complaint.  Use the complaint as a checklist during trial to ensure that you have all elements of your case.</li> </ol> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Reminding us that Yogi Berra once said, “You’ve got to be very careful if you don’t know where you’re going, because you might not get there,” Judge Pepper’s program showed that a well-drafted complaint does more than get you through the courtroom doors. It determines where you want to end up, and establishes a roadmap to get your client there.  By following Judge Pepper’s wonderful advice, carefully analyzing a case, and referring to the complaint often throughout litigation, EDWBA members can help to maximize the likelihood of achieving a successful outcome for their clients.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000">Spotlight on United States Magistrate Judge James R. Sickel</h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Elizabeth K. Miles</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012winter/2012_winter_image002.jpg" alt="EDWBA" width="150" height="226" align="right" />James R. Sickel serves as part-time magistrate judge for the Eastern District's Green Bay division and maintains a law practice at Hinkfuss, Sickel, Petitjean & Wieting in downtown Green Bay. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Raised in Green Bay, Judge Sickel earned an undergraduate degree in history from Marquette University in 1967 and a law degree from Marquette University Law School in 1974.  Between college and law school he spent several years with the Peace Corps in Colombia,where he worked in orphanages, juvenile courts, and food distribution centers.  It was there Judge Sickel decided to pursue law. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> In law school Judge Sickel gravitated to litigation, and he joined Crooks and Parins in Green Bay after graduation.  A year later, he joined Bittner, Petitjean & Hinkfuss which subsequently became his current firm, Hinkfuss, Sickel, Petitjean & Wieting.  Judge Sickel’s practice focuses on business litigation, real estate transactions, municipal law and estate work.  When just out of law school, Judge Sickel was the only Spanish-speaking attorney in an area that had little demand for one.  That changed, however, as the Spanish-speaking population of Green Bay increased significantly, giving the Judge many opportunities to use his second language in his private practice.<br />       <br /> In 1991, Judge Sickel was appointed part-time magistrate judge for the Eastern District's Green Bay division.  He has been re-appointed to consecutive four-year terms ever since.  Judge Sickel handles preliminary proceedings for all criminal cases and presides over misdemeanor cases from initial appearance through sentencing.  He also issues writs, warrants and complaints for the Green Bay division, including search, arrest, postal service, and OSHA warrants.  A large part of Judge Sickel's duties involve conducting mediations in civil cases.  Judge Sickel enjoys helping parties reach a mutually agreeable solution and finds it particularly gratifying when businesses can settle their case through mediation, salvage their relationship and continue working together. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> If practicing before Judge Sickel in a criminal matter, he advises that counsel augment the pretrial services report as comprehensively as possible.  The pretrial services report helps him determine whether to release or detain a defendant before trial, so practitioners are encouraged to highlight any information that will help inform this decision.  If you are before Judge Sickel or one of his colleagues in mediation, Judge Sickel encourages you to think creatively, and to consider solutions that involve more than just paying or accepting money.  Judge Sickel also encourages litigants to consider early mediation before plunging into expensive motion practice and to avoid a scattershot approach to a case.  Hone in on the real issues and focus your efforts where your client is likely to succeed, he advises, and be flexible when considering potential resolutions.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> In his free time Judge Sickel enjoys time with his family - his wife, daughter, two sons and daughters-in-laws, and baby granddaughter.  Judge Sickel has been active in historical preservation projects in Green Bay -<a title="_GoBack" name="_GoBack" id="_GoBack"></a> restoring a Carnegie Library building (now the Jefferson Court Building), helping to preserve Hazelwood, the home of the Brown County Historical Society, and serving on the board of Heritage Hill Historical Park Foundation.  He also serves on the boards of the Wisconsin Equal Justice Fund, Inc., and the Marquette University Law School Alumni Association. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Judge Sickel's office is located in the Jefferson Court Building, also housing the Federal District Court in Green Bay. He can be reached at (920) 432-7716. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000">EDWBA Federal Sentencing Panel</h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Bridget J. Domaszek</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> On February 3, 2012, the EDWBA sponsored a Bench and Bar event at the Federal Courthouse, which included lunch followed by a panel discussion of federal sentencing issues.  The panel featured United States District Court Judges Lynn Adelman, William C. Griesbach, and Rudolph T. Randa, and was moderated by Michael M. O’Hear, Associate Dean for Research at Marquette University Law School.  In response to questions posed by Dean O’Hear and members of the audience, the panel covered a wide array of sentencing issues, including application of the guidelines, the need for sentencing consistency at the district and national levels, the right of allocution, the need for individualized sentences that are tailored to the offense and the offender, and substantial assistance motions.  Additionally, panel members discussed particular sentencing issues in their respective courts, including the importance of sentencing memoranda.  Many thanks to Jonathan Koenig, Chris Donovan and Katy Borowski for their work organizing this event. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000">Accepting a <i><i>Pro Bono</i></i> Appointment in the Eastern District of Wisconsin: Representing an Incarcerated Person in a Section 1983 Civil Rights Claim</h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>William F. Sulton</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> There are more than 2 million Americans in our federal and state prisons and local jails.  In Wisconsin alone there are more than 23,000 incarcerated persons. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Mass incarceration results in lawsuits.  When a prisoner’s constitutional and/or statutory rights are violated, they need private lawyers to accept <i>pro bono</i> appointments.  Civil rights cases, although counterintuitive, are prosecuted by private attorneys. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> I was recently appointed to represent a man named Jessie Williams.  Mr. Williams filed suit against several correctional officers at Waupun Correctional Institution (WCI).  Only one of the defendants remained in the lawsuit by the time I was appointed.  Mr. Williams alleged that the officers violated his Eighth Amendment rights to adequate medical care and treatment by ignoring his requests for medical assistance during an asthmatic attack.  Mr. Williams was on suicide watch at the time. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> During one of several trips to WCI, I chatted up an officer who was not a defendant in the case.  I asked him about his experience at WCI.  What he told me was shocking.  He said that WCI’s population is currently twice its capacity.  The officer described the negative impact overpopulation had on the inmates and officers, such as safety concerns, sleeping arrangements and the decrease in the quality of the food. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Overpopulation helps to explain Mr. Williams’ plight at WCI and his case.  At the time of trial, he had spent the past eight years in solitary confinement.  He was originally segregated for disciplinary reasons; but he stayed because there was no other place to put him.  He is totally dependent on the officers for everything, including companionship. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Mr. Williams’ case was further complicated by his illiteracy.  Opposing counsel began Mr. Williams’ deposition by asking him how far he got in school.  He told her that he completed his junior year of high school but did not graduate.  It is difficult to imagine how Mr. Williams made it that far with less than a third-grade reading level.  His father, who is also a prisoner at WCI, wrote the complaint. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> With his father’s assistance, Mr. Williams litigated his case through the process required by the Prisoner’s Litigation Reform Act (PLRA).  The PLRA requires prisoners to exhaust the administrative remedies created by the prison before filing a complaint in federal court.  After several appeals through WCI’s internal grievance procedure, Mr. Williams filed a complaint in the Eastern District.  He was inundated with disclosures he could not read and discovery requests he could not understand.  Despite these obstacles, Mr. Williams managed to defeat the officer’s motion for summary judgment and the court appointed counsel to represent him at trial. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Representing Mr. Williams was one of the most rewarding experiences of my career.  His complaints were legitimate and deserved legal representation.  I ask all of you to think back to why you went to law school.  Chances are you were like me: you wanted to use the legal system to help others.  You can help others and our legal system by accepting a <i>pro bono</i> appointment. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> If you are willing to be appointed to a <i>pro bono</i> litigant in the Eastern District of Wisconsin or for more information regarding <i>pro bono</i> appointments please contact the court’s <i>pro se</i> law clerks, Jenny Hong (414-297-3362) or Kelly Mangan (414-297-3361). </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000">EDWBA 10th Annual Meeting and Presentation: A Preview</h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Katy Borowski</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association is hosting its 10th Annual Meeting and Presentation on Thursday, April 26.  The morning will be filled with CLE seminars beginning with a plenary program featuring the state’s law school deans.  Marquette University Law School Dean Joseph D. Kearny and the University of Wisconsin Law School Dean Margaret Raymond will each discuss a case pending before the Supreme Court this term.  Following the plenary, guests will have the option to choose between three interesting breakout programs. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The luncheon begins at 11:30 a.m. and will start with a keynote from Collins T. Fitzpatrick, Circuit Executive of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.  Following Mr. Fitzpatrick’s remarks, the awards will be presented.  This year’s recipients include:  Hon. James E. Shapiro, recipient of the Judge Myron L. Gordon Lifetime Achievement Award; Hon. Charles N. Clevert, Jr., recipient of the Nathan A. Fishbach Founder’s Award; the Milwaukee Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association, recipient of the Judge Robert W. Warren Public Service Award; Bruce A. Lanser, recipient of the Judge Dale E. Ihlenfeldt Bankruptcy Award; Hon. Patricia J. Gorence and Hon. Nancy Joseph, recipients of the Judge John W. Reynolds Community Building Award.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The program will conclude with the election of new officers and board members. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Please watch your mailbox later this month for your invitation.  It will include all the program details as well as profiles of each of the award recipients. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> For questions, please contact Katy Borowski at 414-276-5933 or <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy77030 = 'kborowski' + '@'; addy77030 = addy77030 + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; var addy_text77030 = 'kborowski' + '@' + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy77030 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text77030); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script>. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association<br /> <a href="http://edwba.org">www.edwba.org</a><br /> 424 East Wells Street<br /> Milwaukee, WI 53202</span> </p> </td> <td align="center"> <p align="right"> <span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Executive Director<br /> Katy Borowski<br /> 414-276-5933<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy44841 = 'kborowski' + '@'; addy44841 = addy44841 + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; var addy_text44841 = 'kborowski' + '@' + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy44841 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text44841); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script></span> </p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" align="center" valign="middle" style="background-image: url('http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r7_c1.jpg')"><span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br /> </span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <div class="item-separator"></div> </div> <div class="item column-2"> <h2> The Docket - October 2012 </h2> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" /> <style type="text/css"><!-- h1{text-transform:uppercase;} --></style> <title style="font-size: 24px; line-height: 28.8px">titleThe Docket - The Newsletter of the Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="972"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="972" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r1_c1.jpg" border="0" width="610" height="49" /></td> <td><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/gradient_repeat.jpg" border="0" width="20" height="49" /></td> <td width="342"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r1_c5.jpg" border="0" width="342" height="49" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="972" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td width="262"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/logo_top.jpg" border="0" width="262" height="88" /></td> <td width="5"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r2_c3.jpg" border="0" width="494" height="88" /></td> <td><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r2_c6.jpg" width="216" height="88" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="972" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="240" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="5" cellpadding="0" width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">October 2012<br /> <br /> </span></h2></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <div> <h3 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 18px; color: #000000"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><b>EDWBA Leadership</b></span></h3> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Executive Committee</b> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>President</b><br /> Allen C. Schlinsog, Jr.<br /> Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren<br /> 414-298-1000<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy20241 = 'aschlins' + '@'; addy20241 = addy20241 + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text20241 = 'aschlins' + '@' + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy20241 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text20241); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>President Elect</b><br /> Anthony S. Baish<br /> Godfrey & Kahn<br /> 414-273-5198<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy48142 = 'tbaish' + '@'; addy48142 = addy48142 + 'gklaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text48142 = 'tbaish' + '@' + 'gklaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy48142 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text48142); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Vice President</b><br /> Jonathan H. Koenig<br /> U.S. Attorney’s Office<br /> 414-297-4399<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy1898 = 'Jonathan.h.koenig' + '@'; addy1898 = addy1898 + 'usdoj' + '.' + 'gov'; var addy_text1898 = 'Jonathan.h.koenig' + '@' + 'usdoj' + '.' + 'gov'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy1898 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text1898); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Secretary</b><br /> Sandra R. Gegios<br /> U.S. District Court Eastern District<br /> 414-297-3071<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy7401 = 'Sandra_gegios' + '@'; addy7401 = addy7401 + 'wied' + '.' + 'uscourts' + '.' + 'gov'; var addy_text7401 = 'Sandra_gegios' + '@' + 'wied' + '.' + 'uscourts' + '.' + 'gov'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy7401 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text7401); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Treasurer</b><br /> T. Wickham Schmidt<br /> Liebmann, Conway, Olejniczak<br /> & Jerry<br /> 920-437-0476<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy30079 = 'tws' + '@'; addy30079 = addy30079 + 'lcojlaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text30079 = 'tws' + '@' + 'lcojlaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy30079 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text30079); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Past President</b><br /> Matthew W. O’Neill<br /> Fox, O’Neill & Shannon<br /> 414-273-3939<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy69385 = 'mwoneill' + '@'; addy69385 = addy69385 + 'foslaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text69385 = 'mwoneill' + '@' + 'foslaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy69385 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text69385); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Program Co-chairs</b><br /> Scott W. Hansen<br /> Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren<br /> 414-298-8123<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy45055 = 'shansen' + '@'; addy45055 = addy45055 + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text45055 = 'shansen' + '@' + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy45055 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text45055); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Daniel E. Conley<br /> Quarles & Brady<br /> 414-277-5609<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy23216 = 'daniel.conley' + '@'; addy23216 = addy23216 + 'quarles' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text23216 = 'daniel.conley' + '@' + 'quarles' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy23216 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text23216); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Board of Directors</b><br /> Craig W. Albee<br /> Paul E. Benson<br /> Melinda Hein Bialzik<br /> Donald A. Daugherty, Jr.<br /> Christopher D. Donovan<br /> Michelle L. Jacobs<br /> Laura Schulteis Kwaterski<br /> Eric L. Maassen<br /> Cassandra H. McCauley<br /> Timothy F. Nixon<br /> Katherine Maloney Perhach<br /> Elizabeth C. Perkins<br /> Hon. Nelson W. Phillips III<br /> Prof. Ryan Scoville<br /> Jan A. Smokowicz<br /> Julie P. Wilson </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Ex-Officio Board Members</b><br /> Hon. Charles N. Clevert, Jr.<br /> Terri L. Full<br /> Hon. Patricia J. Gorence<br /> Hon. William C. Griesbach<br /> Hon. Nancy Joseph<br /> Hon. Elsa C. Lamelas<br /> Hon. Margaret Dee McGarity<br /> Janet L. Medlock<br /> Hon. Pamela Pepper<br /> Hon. Rudolph T. Randa<br /> Jon Sanfilippo<br /> Hon. J.P. Stadtmueller<br /> Donald J. Wall </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>President’s Council</b><br /> William J. Mulligan<br /> Kathleen S. Donius<br /> Daniel T. Flaherty<br /> Scott J. Campbell<br /> Robert L. Gegios<br /> Kathy L. Nusslock<br /> Cristina D. Hernandez<br /> G. Michael Halfenger </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Committee Chairs</b> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Bankruptcy</b><br /> Bruce G. Arnold<br /> Peter C. Blain </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Civil</b><br /> Donald A. Daugherty, Jr.<br /> Elizabeth C. Perkins </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Criminal</b><br /> Bridget J. Domaszek<br /> Christopher D. Donovan </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Membership</b><br /> Mark A. Cameli<br /> Hon. Nelson W. Phillips III </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Newsletter</b><br /> Elizabeth K. Miles<br /> Julie P. Wilson </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b><i>Pro Bono</i></b><br /> Jennifer C. Hong<br /> Robert (Rock) Theine Pledl </p> <h3 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> </h3></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="732" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="5" cellpadding="5" width="300"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000; text-align: center"> <a href="http://edwba.org/The-Docket-October-2012.html">If you are having problems viewing the contents of this newsletter, please click here.</a> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000; text-align: center"> <br /> </p> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>Letter from the President</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012fall/edwba-pres.jpg" alt="EDWBA President" width="250" height="341" align="right" />"Condolences" were offered to me more than once when I started this year as President of the EDWBA.  Although the comments were made in jest, the message was clear -- there was a great deal of work ahead.  Looking back, the first few months on the job have been very busy, but pursuing our mission has never felt like work.   </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> As described in this issue of The Docket, we held an entertaining and very informative Introduction to the Eastern District program for attorneys new to federal practice, and we got to know each other better while honoring Judge Clevert at our Evening at the Courthouse last month.  This week we honored 37 <i>pro bono</i> volunteers at a luncheon with our judges.  Next week Judge Gorence will be moderating a discussion between our U.S. Attorney, Jim Santelle, and our Federal Defender, Dan Stiller.  And we have several great programs lined up for November, including a celebration of Judge Shapiro's career, our annual e-Discovery program, and a CLE and Evening at the Courthouse in Green Bay to welcome Judge Griesbach as our new Chief Judge.  Honestly, all this has been great fun.  And there is much more to come throughout the year.  Stick with us, and I promise you will feel the difference as we continue to foster bench-bar relations, improve the administration of justice, and promote professionalism in our community. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> On a different note, this issue is reaching you during National <i>Pro Bono</i> Celebration Week.  I talk often about our need to dig deep and do more, but we need to continue that conversation. While driving to the office one morning recently, the radio news reported another co-sleeping fatality, a woman who was killed and whose unborn child was taken from her body, and a two year old girl that was pushed back into a burning house by her father after she had escaped the fire.  And as I am writing this, another mass shooting occurred today in our community -- this time at a spa in Brookfield. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> These are the headlines, but so much tragedy never makes the news. It occurs every day in the lives of those around us.  As an example, several students spent the day at the courthouse a few weeks ago with Judge Joseph during her Kids, Courts and Citizenship program.  As we talked, it became clear that serious struggles with crime, violence, drugs and teen pregnancy were common for these high-schoolers.  And they certainly are not alone. I am very blessed to be able to work with so many kind and talented people in this organization.  I know you already are doing a lot to help others, but we need to do more. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Why you?  The truth is, very few people have the ability to do what you do.  Most cannot stand up for others in the courtroom.  You can.  Whether you believe that your talents were given to you by chance or through God's Grace, we all can agree that our gifts are special.  Because they are so unique, we have a responsibility to share our talents with those that cannot help themselves.   </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> So, please, take a <i>pro bono</i> case, support a charity with your time or treasure, or help mentor the youth in our community to break through the walls that confine them.  We also have several specific new opportunities for you, including staffing the legal help line (described in this issue) and staffing the bankruptcy <i>pro se</i> help desk.  If you would like other suggestions, please don't hesitate to call me or our <i>Pro Bono</i> Committee chairs. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> If we work together, our federal court family can do great good, we can obtain justice, and we can change lives.  If we all do just a little bit, it will add up to quite a lot.  And in the end, we just might realize that the lives we changed were our own. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Good luck, and many blessings. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012fall/image001.png" width="144" height="49" alt="Allen C. Schlinsog, Jr." /> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Allen C. Schlinsog, Jr.<br /> President </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <br /> </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>Evening at the Courthouse</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> On Thursday, September 27, 2012, the Eastern District Bar Association sponsored its 4th Annual Evening at the Courthouse. Nearly 200 guests were in attendance. All were treated to good food, music and conversation, as well as a special program. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> After a welcome from EDWBA President Al Schlinsog, the program spotlighted the career and contributions of Chief Judge Charles N. Clevert, Jr., who takes senior status October 31. Those who paid tribute to Judge Clevert included former District Attorney E. Michael McCann, Georgette Williams from the Careers in Law and Justice Program, and Judge William C. Griesbach representing the district court. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> To conclude the program, two of Judge Clevert’s current law clerks, Joan Harms and Margo Kirchner, spoke of the judge from the perspective of his chambers and observing his administration of the law on a daily basis. On behalf of the bar association, they presented him with the following proclamation from Mayor Tom Barrett: </p> <blockquote> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The City of Milwaukee joins family, friends, and colleagues in commemorating the career of the Honorable Charles N. Clevert, Jr. on Thursday, September 27, 2012; and, </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> WHEREAS, Chief Judge Charles N. Clevert, Jr. has served Milwaukee and the Eastern District of Wisconsin since 1977, as a United States Bankruptcy Judge and United States District Judge and has chosen to continue to serve and maintain a caseload as a Senior District Judge; and, </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> WHEREAS, in the past 35 years, Chief Judge Charles N. Clevert, Jr. has demonstrated his commitment to the administration of justice and to the federal judiciary, and continues to treat each case and individual appearing in his court with the utmost respect; and, </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> WHEREAS, Chief Judge Charles N. Clevert, Jr. has served the judiciary nationally through his work with the Executive Committee of the National Conference of Federal Trial Judges; the Budget Committee of the Judicial Conference of the United States; the ABA’s American Jury Project, Federal Judicial Improvements Committee, and House of Delegates; the Boards of Directors of the American Judicature Society, Justice at Stake, and the American Bankruptcy Institute; his role as the Past President of the National Conference of Bankruptcy Judges; and his support of the Just the Beginning Foundation; and </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> WHEREAS, Chief Judge Charles N. Clevert, Jr. is recognized locally for his inspiration, guidance, and leadership in the Men of Tomorrow, Careers in Law and Justice, the Milwaukee Bar Association, the Wisconsin Association of African American Lawyers, the Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association, the State Bar of Wisconsin, and as co-founder of the Thomas E. Fairchild American Inn of Court; and </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> WHEREAS, Chief Judge Charles N. Clevert, Jr. was the first African American in Wisconsin to be appointed United States Bankruptcy Judge and United States District Judge; and </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> WHEREAS, Chief Judge Charles N. Clevert, Jr. through his work, mentoring and volunteer activities, demonstrates his ongoing commitment to ensuring equal opportunities for all; </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> NOW, THEREFORE, I, TOM BARRETT, Mayor of the City of Milwaukee, do hereby proclaim Thursday, September 27, 2012 to be </p> </blockquote> <p align="center"> CHARLES N. CLEVERT, JR. DAY </p> <blockquote> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> throughout the City of Milwaukee. </p> </blockquote> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>The Honorable Thomas J. Curran</b><br /> <b>(1924-2012</b>)</h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> On July 1, 1975, Attorney Thomas Curran was driving through Sauk County with his wife and children when a 1967 Ford Mustang, which was stopped at an intersection and pointed in the opposite direction, was rear ended by a third car and pushed across the median into the path of the Curran car. The Mustang’s fuel tank erupted leaving the occupants engulfed in flames. Although both he and his wife had been injured, Curran had the presence of mind to triage the victims. He grabbed a blanket from his car and used it to rescue one of the occupants of the Mustang from the fire. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> A lawsuit followed with the Ford Motor Company being sued for punitive damages. <i>See</i> <i>Wangen v. Ford Motor Company, </i>294 N.W.2d 437 (1980). For the first time, the Wisconsin Supreme Court found that punitive damages are recoverable incident to a claim for compensatory damages in an action based upon negligence or strict liability. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Nine years after this rare confluence of a trial lawyer’s life with law of first impression, Judge Curran was presiding over trials (including diversity cases with parties seeking punitive damages) in the federal court in the Eastern District of Wisconsin. His quick-thinking, lifesaving actions at the <i>Wangen</i> crash scene demonstrate the character of the man appointed as a federal judge by President Reagan in 1983. That appointment capped a distinguished career which ended with his death on July 17. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Curran was born in 1924, in Mauston, the county seat of rural Juneau County in south central Wisconsin where his father farmed and operated a grain elevator. After graduating from Mauston High School, he followed his brothers and sister to Marquette University where he joined the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps. Soon, World War II cut short his undergraduate studies. Ordered to the South Pacific while the decisive naval battles of the war were raging, he was, for a time, the youngest line officer in the Pacific. He was aboard a ship waiting to invade Japan when the Japanese surrendered in 1945. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Returning to Marquette, Curran enrolled in the Law School’s Class of 1948. He considered going into practice with classmates and future judges Patrick Sheedy and Robert Curley or becoming an associate at a large firm. Instead, his love for his native Juneau County brought him back to Mauston, where he joined his two brothers already in practice. After graduation in July, Curran married Colette Saether, whom he had met before the war when she was a student at Mount Mary. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Curran’s practice in Mauston grew rapidly. He focused on trial work, but as a general practitioner in a small town, he dealt with a wide variety of legal issues and became an astute judge of human nature. He served as city attorney, worked on economic development projects in Juneau County, and occasionally was called upon to advise the Diocese of La Crosse. When he ran his successful campaign for President of the State Bar of Wisconsin, one of his earliest supporters for that office was Rice Lake’s Edward Conley, father of William Conley, federal district judge in the Western District of Wisconsin, and Daniel Conley, a partner at Quarles & Brady and former member of the Board of Governors of the Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association. After his 1972-73 term as bar president expired, Curran served on the Wisconsin Judicial Council, the State Judicial Commission, and the Governor’s Commission on Crime and Law Enforcement. His exceptional thirty-five year career in private practice earned him an invitation to be a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> In 1983, President Reagan appointed Curran to the federal district bench with the unanimous consent of the Senate. He filled the slot left by Judge Myron Gordon who had assumed senior status. Faced initially with a crushing case load, Judge Curran attempted to maximize his use of time. WTMJ Radio talk show host Jeff Wagner, formerly an Assistant United States Attorney, related that: </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> "One of my most vivid recollections of Judge Curran also involves one of my most challenging weeks as a prosecutor. Through a quirk of scheduling, I had two separate narcotics prosecutions scheduled to start on the same day before Judge Curran. When neither case settled, I assumed (naively as it turns out) that Judge Curran would reschedule one of the two until a later date. Silly me! Bright and early one Monday morning, we picked a jury for the first case. Once the jury was selected, Judge Curran informed the jurors that we'd be proceeding from 8 until 12:30 each day and that they should return Tuesday morning for opening statements. We then picked a jury in the second case - which was to be tried from 1:15 until 5:00 p.m. each day. Most attorneys can go months or years without trying a case in federal court. Thanks to Judge Curran, I had two federal jury trials in one week. To be precise, I had two simultaneous federal jury trials before the same judge. I'm willing to bet that there aren't too many attorneys who can make that claim.” </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Coming from a practice dealing mainly with state law, Judge Curran, with his Navy background, particularly enjoyed the admiralty cases. He also came to appreciate the challenge of the federal intellectual property cases which required him to become a student of low alcohol beer trademarks, turkey decoy copyrights, and superstar wrestling. The wrestler witnesses in the latter case, <i>United Wrestling Association, Inc. v. Titan Sports, Inc., No. 2:90-cv-00991, </i>entertained courtroom onlookers for several days by performing such feats as breaking boards with karate chops. Despite the testimony of defense witness Linda McMahon, a former performer and officer of the behemoth Titan Sports/World Wrestling Entertainment (and now a candidate for the U.S. Senate from Connecticut), the local plaintiff, Albert Patterson, won the case. Other Curran decisions in cases involving city-suburban school desegregation, county jail conditions, group homes for the disabled, and the funding of Miller Park will continue to affect the citizens of the Eastern District for years to come. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> While Curran had many professional and civic accomplishments, he was most proud of his family, which also grew rapidly. Judge Curran and his lifelong love Colette had six children, whom he would be proud to report are all college graduates, practicing Catholics, happily married, and blessed him with 16 grandchildren. Three of his children – William, Catherine (Orton), and Paul – followed in their father’s footsteps and became lawyers, as did two of his grandsons, Peter Curran and Richard Orton. William and Catherine are still partners at the family’s 75+ year old law firm, Curran, Hollenbeck & Orton S.C., and Paul is now a Juneau County Circuit Court Judge. Grandson Peter also recently joined the family firm in Mauston. Grandson Richard Orton is an associate at Crivello Carlson and one of the EDWBA’s newest members. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Richard Orton, Grandson</b> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> ‘Papa’ (as I knew him) was the complete gentleman. He treated everyone with the same unwavering courtesy, patience, kindness, and good humor, no matter the situation or their station in life. Modest and filled with a sense of gratitude, he was always quick to attribute whatever successes he enjoyed to the help he received from those around him (particularly to my grandmother when it came to his family). He was the ultimate role model for his grandchildren, but especially for Peter and me, who recently began practicing law and enjoyed discussing legal issues with him over the past several years. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Some of my fondest memories are of our large, frequent family gatherings at his lake home, where Papa was often ‘holding court’ with us grandchildren. He would regularly interview all of us about school, our sports teams, and other typical topics. But more serious inquiries were also occasionally required, such as determining the location of someone’s coveted marshmallow stick, how sand from the bottom of the lake got in someone’s hair, or whether someone’s ‘head was cold’ at the dinner table (translation: take your hat off!). As in the Eastern District, he ran a ‘tight ship.’ </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Jacqueline Dee, Law Clerk</b> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> It was my privilege to serve as Judge Curran’s law clerk during his twenty-three years on the federal bench. His infectious optimism and good humor pervaded his chambers from the first day he set up shop in temporary quarters on December 31, 1983. Working in his chambers was not only an education in the law, but a continuing first-hand example of how to live a successful life balancing work and family. Studies have concluded that the majority of lawyers are unhappy in their chosen field, but Judge Curran revered the profession and the rule of law. He encouraged support for the mission of the State Bar, the Wisconsin Law Foundation, and his alma mater Marquette. He even undertook to promote the benefits of bar dues and CLE requirements to disgruntled government lawyers. His decision to leave the bench to assume the unsung role of his wife’s caretaker during her lengthy illness was done cheerfully and with his usual “can do” attitude. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> In 1985, Judge Reynolds transferred the city-suburban school desegregation case to Judge Curran. In addition to calling upon the Judge’s extensive experience dealing with Wisconsin school boards while in private practice, this litigation highlighted many of his personal and professional talents. Always eager to use his handyman skills, the Judge directed the transformation of his small courtroom to accommodate the plaintiffs (four school children and their mothers, the Board of School Directors of the City of Milwaukee, and the NAACP) and the defendants (twenty four suburbs, then-Governor Tommy Thompson, and the State Superintendent of Public Instruction). He had the spectator seats removed and replaced with counsel tables, put the press in the jury box, and set up a remote viewing room where the public could watch via a cable feed. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> After listening to testimony for three months, the Judge, who had been studying school desegregation cases from other districts, became quite concerned about the length of time many of these other cases had been pending while the costs to the taxpayers mounted. <i>Brown v. Board of Education I and II, </i>for example, was first-filed in 1951, and would remain before various courts until 1999. Another case, arising in Baton Rouge, was active for forty seven years. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> One morning the Judge, having considered these precedents, confided that he thought the Milwaukee lawsuit could and should be settled. He asked the superintendents of the school board parties to convene at the Federal Building where he installed them in separate vacant rooms. He visited each room, listened attentively to all of their positions, found common ground, and settled the case, thereby saving the taxpayers of Milwaukee County untold millions of dollars. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> When Judge Curran received the Myron L. Gordon Lifetime Achievement Award from the Eastern District Bar Association in 2002, he used the occasion to thank his staff and he would surely want them recognized now. His Judicial Assistant Barbara Furlick had a long lineage with the federal government, having worked two stints for the Office of the United States Attorney before she joined the Judicial Branch. Howard Erickson served Justice Louis Ceci in state court before becoming the first Curran court reporter. During the lengthy city-suburban school litigation, John Schindhelm and his wife Carol, both court reporters, augmented the staff. After Howard’s retirement, John joined the chambers and introduced real time reporting to the courthouse where he is still recording eastern district trials. Judge Curran’s first courtroom deputy was Bobbie Patterson, now retired. Dee Brock McLeod, who joined the Clerk’s Office under Ruth LaFave, took her place and is currently in charge of scheduling interpreters and court reporters. The Judge’s first court security officer was Ed Trucksa, who, as an Arms, Tobacco, and Firearms agent, traced the gun that Lee Harvey Oswald used to assassinate President Kennedy. When Ed retired, he was succeeded by Tom Hultgren, a former member of an elite Milwaukee Police Department intelligence unit. The staff will forever miss Judge Curran’s genial company and sage advice. To us he was the touchstone of The Greatest Generation. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>Federal Courthouse Opens Its Doors to Milwaukee</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Elizabeth Miles and Stephanie Quick</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Did you know that the atrium of the federal courthouse in Milwaukee was once the mail sorting space for the post office? Can you spot the dragons and faces on the interior and exterior of the courthouse building? On September 22, 2012, visitors learned these facts and more as the historic federal courthouse participated in the second annual Doors Open Milwaukee, an event that allows visitors to explore over 125 buildings in downtown Milwaukee not generally open to the public. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Visitors to the courthouse explored the atrium, the ceremonial courtroom, the centennial courtroom, and the courthouse exterior. They also enjoyed the rare opportunity to photograph the courthouse’s beautiful interior. The atrium was open to all and contained pictures of the construction of the courthouse, an original mail cart, and information on the desegregation of Milwaukee’s public schools. It also held a cardboard cut out of one of the building’s stone figures through which people could insert their faces for a fun picture. A limited number of ticketed visitors toured the ceremonial courtroom (Judge Adelman’s courtroom) and the centennial courtroom (Judge Randa’s courtroom) and learned about the historical features of each courtroom and their current uses. </p> <table width="100" border="0" align="center" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012fall/sdc12133_custom.JPG" width="220" height="146" alt="edwba" /></td> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012fall/sdc12175_custom.JPG" width="220" height="146" alt="edwba" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012fall/sdc12177_custom.JPG" width="220" height="146" alt="edwba" /></td> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012fall/sdc12188_custom.JPG" width="220" height="146" alt="edwba" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> During the exterior tour, many visitors were intrigued by the courthouse’s castle-like features. Tour leaders pointed out the lions, dragons and faces on the outside of the building and the clock tower and time capsule at the front of the building. Visitors learned about building additions and why a garden exists at the corner of Wisconsin Avenue and Jefferson Street. (Answer: George Hrin, a member of the maintenance staff of the building, originally started the garden, and the garden is now dedicated to him.) </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> An overwhelming response to the tour was excitement in seeing spaces typically not open to the public. Numerous visitors remarked that they had lived in the Milwaukee area their whole lives and had never been inside the courthouse. One visitor remarked that “it must be wonderful to work in this building.” Another was impressed by his tour leader’s obvious respect for the court system. Visitors also commented on the beautiful woodwork in the courtrooms, declaring the courtrooms “fantastic” and “very cool!” Many people were intrigued by the work of the court, asking about the role of federal judges, how often the courtrooms are used, and even how jurors are selected. One couple who visited many of the buildings open to the public over the weekend said the federal courthouse was their favorite! </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Barbara Fritschel, courthouse librarian, estimates that between 1,000 and 1,200 people visited the courthouse during Doors Open Milwaukee. Many thanks to the volunteers who guided visitors through the courthouse – including courthouse employees, Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association members, and the interior decorator for one of the courtroom renovations – for making this a successful event. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>An Introduction to the Eastern District of Wisconsin</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Eric L. Andrews & Ashley E. Fale</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> On September 13, 2012, the Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association sponsored a program at the Federal Courthouse for lawyers in their first three years of practice. The program began with a continental breakfast and was followed by sound advice from several individual speakers and two panel discussions. The individual speakers included United States District Court Chief Judge Charles N. Clevert, Jr.; United States Bankruptcy Court Chief Judge Pamela Pepper; First Assistant U.S. Attorney Gregory Haanstad; and Assistant Federal Defender Craig Albee. There was also a session led by three of the trusted members of the U.S. District Court Clerk's Office, who provided significant insight into the world of e-filing. The final panel of speakers offered advice regarding “dos and don’ts of federal practice” and was lead by three local attorneys who frequently practice in the Eastern District. The program concluded with a guided tour of the architecturally-significant Federal Courthouse. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The over-arching theme of the program was the importance of civility among attorneys who practice in Eastern District. Due to the small size of the federal bar, civility among practitioners is crucial. Judge Pepper expressed this concept best when she stated that “how you say something is often as important as what you say.” The individual speakers and panelists also reminded the recent graduates and potential Eastern District practitioners to know and respect the local rules, paying close attention to the preferences of different judges. Additional valuable advice was to develop good relationships with fellow attorneys, to provide direct and honest answers to a judge’s questions, to never shy from addressing authority contrary to your position, and to always be on time, prepared, and with an error-free brief in hand. Many thanks to Katy Borowski for organizing and notifying new attorneys of this event. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b><i>Pro Bono</i> Recognition Luncheon</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Jennifer C. Hong</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association hosted its second annual <i>Pro Bono</i> Recognition Luncheon on October 23, 2012, which fell within the American Bar Association-sponsored National <i>Pro Bono</i> Celebration Week. Attorneys who had completed <i>pro bono</i> requests from the court over the past year were recognized and honored at this luncheon with the judges of the Eastern District. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Please join us in thanking the following attorneys who have shown their committment to <i>pro bono</i> work in the Eastern District of Wisconsin: </p> <table width="400" border="0" cellspacing="5" cellpadding="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Dillon J. Ambrose<br /> David L. Anstaett<br /> Anthony S. Baish<br /> Eric G. Barber<br /> Steven J. Berryman<br /> Truscenialyn Brooks<br /> Timothy W. Burns<br /> Nathaniel Cade, Jr.<br /> Andrew B. Coursin<br /> Donald A. Daugherty, Jr.<br /> Alyssa D. Dowse<br /> Jeffrey A. Evans<br /> Cynthia J. Franecki<br /> Heather K. Gatewood<br /> Jennifer H. Jin<br /> Robert F. Johnson<br /> David E. Jones<br /> Robert J. Kasieta<br /> Kristina C. Lemanski<br /> </p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Joel R. Levin <br /> Christopher G. Meadows<br /> Elizabeth K. Miles <br /> William P. McKinley<br /> Mollie A. Newcomb<br /> Kathy L. Nusslock<br /> Monica M. Ortiz<br /> Britton Payne<br /> A. Steven Porter<br /> Jeffrey W. Purnell<br /> Natalie R. Remington<br /> T. Wickham Schmidt<br /> Robert J. Silverman<br /> Martin R. Stein<br /> William F. Sulton<br /> Scott A. Wales<br /> David A. Westrup<br /> Matthew M. Wuest </p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>Welcoming New Citizens Through Naturalization Ceremonies</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Laura Cronin</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Every month, District, Magistrate, and Bankruptcy Judges of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin preside over naturalization ceremonies. While the number of ceremonies held at the federal courthouse vary from month to month, typically anywhere from four to six ceremonies are held each month. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> According to Michelle Lipsey, Administrative Assistant to the Clerk of Court, 52 naturalization ceremonies were held in 2011. This year, Ms. Lipsey estimates the court will hold as many as 63 ceremonies. The applicants’ home countries are very diverse. Ms. Lipsey stated she has been present at ceremonies where 30 different nationalities were represented. Generally around 60 applicants are naturalized at each ceremony. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Each presiding judge has his or her own individual style in conducting naturalization ceremonies; however, many of the ceremonies have common themes. For example, the judges will often share with the applicants their personal experiences with the immigration and naturalization process. Bankruptcy Judge Margaret Dee McGarity shared with the citizens her memory of bringing her children from South Korea and taking the oath of citizenship with them. Magistrate Judge William E. Callahan, Jr. told of how his great grandfather came from Ireland during the famine searching for a better life. And Magistrate Judge Nancy Joseph shared the story of an immigrant family who moved from Haiti and worked hard to learn English, save money, and buy a house. She described how they fulfilled a dream for their family in the United States. She then revealed she was telling the story of her own family’s journey to America, and encouraged the new citizens to remember their own stories and pass them down so that future generations know of the sacrifices that were made to bring their families to the United States. </p> <table width="100%" border="0" cellspacing="5" cellpadding="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012fall/wecphoto3_custom.jpg" width="250" height="187" alt="edwba" /></td> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012fall/cncphoto2_custom.jpg" width="250" height="187" alt="edwba" /></td> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012fall/cncphoto1_custom.jpg" width="250" height="187" alt="edwba" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The presiding judges will also commonly explain to the applicants the oath they are about to take. As Magistrate Judge Callahan explained, the oath has two parts. In the first part, the applicants renounce their allegiance and fidelity to their former countries of citizenship. In the second part, the applicants promise to support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States and to bear arms, perform noncombatant services, or perform work of national importance on behalf of the United States when required by law. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Although they renounce their prior citizenship, the judges tell the applicants not to forget the cultures they came from. Chief Judge Charles N. Clevert emphasized that the “fabric of America is strengthened by an ever diverse citizenry.” Finally, the judges impart on the applicants that while citizenship brings with it opportunities, it also brings responsibilities, such as voting and jury duty. As Judge Clevert stated “citizenship is not a spectator sport.” </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Magistrate Judge Callahan says he enjoys naturalization ceremonies because it is an opportunity as a judge to preside over a courtroom where everyone leaves happy. One such new citizen was Ainah, who was naturalized on May 3, 2012. Ainah, originally from Liberia, said regarding his new citizenship that it was a “great opportunity to participate in democracy” and he was “excited to be a part of it.” </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>EDWBA <i>Pro Se</i> Legal Help Line</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Kelly Mangan</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The <i>Pro Bono</i> Committee of the EDWBA is proud to announce its new <i>Pro Se</i> Legal Help Line, which will be up and running in early 2013. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The purpose of the Help Line is to assist non-prisoner <i>pro se</i> civil litigants in the Eastern District of Wisconsin. Help Line volunteer attorneys will provide one-to-one consultations with the litigants. We anticipate that questions will include how to file a civil case, write litigation documents, and respond to requests for information. Help Line volunteer attorneys also may help the <i>pro se</i> litigants understand deadlines, procedures, statutes, local rules, and case law. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Calls to the Help Line will be routed through the already existing Milwaukee Bar Association Lawyer Referral and Information Service to Help Line volunteer attorneys. <i>Pro se</i> litigants will be required to sign and return and acknowledgment and agreement regarding the limited representation before they receive a referral to a volunteer attorney for legal advice. Malpractice insurance is available at no charge for Help Line volunteer attorneys through the State Bar of Wisconsin. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> To kick off the search for Help Line volunteers, the <i>Pro Bono</i> Committee will be hosting an ethics CLE luncheon at noon on Monday, November 26, 2012. The CLE will focus on the issues of limited representation and prepare prospective Help Line volunteers for the parameters and pitfalls of limited representation. This ethics CLE will be free for attorneys willing to serve as Help Line volunteers or accept <i>pro bono</i> cases from the Eastern District of Wisconsin. For all others, there will be a cost. The invitation with all the details will be emailed to members soon. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> If you are interested in attending, please contact Katy Borowski at (414) 276-5933 or <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy55705 = 'kborowski' + '@'; addy55705 = addy55705 + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy55705 + '\'>'); document.write(addy55705); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script>. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>The Honorable John C. Shabaz<br /> (1931-2012)</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Statement by the Court Upon the Death of the Honorable John C. Shabaz August 31, 2012 </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The entire court family is saddened by the news of Judge Shabaz's passing.  He left an indelible mark on this Court by his unwavering commitment to securing "the just, speedy and inexpensive determination of every action and proceeding" that came before him, which was both his "Rule 1" and Rule 1 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.  No one worked harder than Judge Shabaz to regularly meet that standard and his presence and example will be missed, as will the Judge himself by his many friends and admirers.  Our sincere condolences go out to Patty and their children at this difficult time. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> - Chief Judge William M. Conley </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>Thank You</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The Docket thanks Laura Schulteis Kwaterski of Foley & Lardner for her years of service as Co-Chair of the Newsletter Committee.  Laura provided wonderful leadership and contributions to the Committee and continues to serve on the EDWBA Board of Directors.  We welcome our new Co-Chair, Elizabeth Miles of Davis & Kuelthau.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Comments about The Docket or ideas for future articles may be sent to Katy Borowski, Julie Wilson or Liz Miles. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>Upcoming EDWBA Events</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> October 29<br /> Criminal Law Policies and Practices in the Eastern District of Wisconsin: Perspectives from United States Attorney James L. Santelle and Federal Defender Daniel W. Stiller </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> November 14<br /> 5th Annual Electronic Discovery Conference<br /> All the latest and greatest in the practice of electronic discovery </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> November 15<br /> Celebrating the Ten-Year Anniversary of the District Court in Green Bay<br /> The event will feature a two-hour CLE followed by a reception at the courthouse. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> November 26<br /> <i>Pro Bono</i> CLE<br /> Timothy J. Pierce, Ethics Counsel for the State Bar of Wisconsin, will present a program focused on ethical considerations for lawyers providing limited scope representation to <i>pro se</i> litigants. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association<br /> <a href="http://edwba.org">www.edwba.org</a><br /> 424 East Wells Street<br /> Milwaukee, WI 53202</span> </p> </td> <td align="center"> <p align="right"> <span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Executive Director<br /> Katy Borowski<br /> 414-276-5933<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy6750 = 'kborowski' + '@'; addy6750 = addy6750 + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; var addy_text6750 = 'kborowski' + '@' + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy6750 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text6750); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script></span> </p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" align="center" valign="middle" style="background-image: url('http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r7_c1.jpg')"><span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br /> </span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <div class="item-separator"></div> </div> <span class="row-separator"></span> </div> <div class="items-row cols-2 row-1"> <div class="item column-1"> <h2> The Docket - June 2012 </h2> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" /> <style type="text/css"><!-- h1{text-transform:uppercase;} --></style> <title style="font-size: 24px; line-height: 28.8px">titleThe Docket - The Newsletter of the Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="972"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="972" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r1_c1.jpg" border="0" width="610" height="49" /></td> <td><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/gradient_repeat.jpg" border="0" width="20" height="49" /></td> <td width="342"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r1_c5.jpg" border="0" width="342" height="49" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="972" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td width="262"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/logo_top.jpg" border="0" width="262" height="88" /></td> <td width="5"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r2_c3.jpg" border="0" width="494" height="88" /></td> <td><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r2_c6.jpg" width="216" height="88" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="972" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="240" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="5" cellpadding="0" width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">June</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"> 2012<br /> <br /> </span></h2></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <div> <h3 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 18px; color: #000000"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><b>EDWBA Leadership</b></span></h3> </div> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Executive Committee</b> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>President</b><br /> Matthew W. O’Neill<br /> Fox, O’Neill & Shannon<br /> 414-273-3939<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy22853 = 'mwoneill' + '@'; addy22853 = addy22853 + 'foslaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text22853 = 'mwoneill' + '@' + 'foslaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy22853 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text22853); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>President Elect</b><br /> Allen C. Schlinsog, Jr.<br /> Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren<br /> 414-298-1000<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy51699 = 'aschlins' + '@'; addy51699 = addy51699 + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text51699 = 'aschlins' + '@' + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy51699 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text51699); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Vice President</b><br /> Anthony S. Baish<br /> Godfrey & Kahn<br /> 414-273-5198<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy18279 = 'aschlins' + '@'; addy18279 = addy18279 + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text18279 = 'tbaish' + '@' + 'gklaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy18279 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text18279); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Secretary</b><br /> Barbara J. Janaszek<br /> Whyte Hirschboeck Dudek<br /> 414-978-5447<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy38608 = 'bjanaszek' + '@'; addy38608 = addy38608 + 'whdlaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text38608 = 'bjanaszek' + '@' + 'whdlaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy38608 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text38608); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Treasurer</b><br /> Sandra R. Gegios<br /> U.S. District Court Eastern District<br /> 414-297-3071<br /> <a href="http://edwba.org/<script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy7365 = 'sandra_gegios' + '@'; addy7365 = addy7365 + 'wied' + '.' + 'uscourts' + '.' + 'gov'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy7365 + '\'>'); document.write(addy7365); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script>"><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy56671 = 'Sandra_gegios' + '@'; addy56671 = addy56671 + 'wied' + '.' + 'uscourts' + '.' + 'gov'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy56671 + '\'>'); document.write(addy56671); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script></a> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Past President</b><br /> G. Michael Halfenger<br /> Foley & Lardner<br /> 414-297-5547<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy3651 = 'mhalfenger' + '@'; addy3651 = addy3651 + 'foleyc' + '.' + 'om'; var addy_text3651 = 'mhalfenger' + '@' + 'foleyc' + '.' + 'om'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy3651 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text3651); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Program Co-chairs</b><br /> Scott W. Hansen<br /> Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren<br /> 414-298-8123<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy39574 = 'shansen' + '@'; addy39574 = addy39574 + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text39574 = 'shansen' + '@' + 'reinhartlaw' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy39574 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text39574); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Elizabeth C. Perkins<br /> Quarles & Brady<br /> 414-277-5763<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy38506 = 'Elizabeth.perkins' + '@'; addy38506 = addy38506 + 'quarles' + '.' + 'com'; var addy_text38506 = 'Elizabeth.perkins' + '@' + 'quarles' + '.' + 'com'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy38506 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text38506); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <br /> <b>Board of Directors</b><br /> Paul E. Benson<br /> Melinda Hein Bialzik<br /> Jennifer L. Bolger<br /> Mark A. Cameli<br /> Jennifer C. Hong<br /> Joseph D. Kearney<br /> Jonathan H. Koenig<br /> Laura Schulteis Kwaterski<br /> Eric L. Maassen<br /> Cassandra H. McCauley<br /> Timothy F. Nixon<br /> T. Wickham Schmidt<br /> Jan A. Smokowicz<br /> Julie P. Wilson </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Ex-Officio Board Members</b><br /> Hon. Charles N. Clevert, Jr.<br /> Terri L. Full<br /> Hon. Patricia J. Gorence<br /> Hon. William C. Griesbach<br /> Hon. Nancy Joseph<br /> Hon. Elsa C. Lamelas<br /> Hon. Margaret Dee McGarity<br /> Janet L. Medlock<br /> Hon. Pamela Pepper<br /> Hon. Rudolph T. Randa<br /> Jon Sanfilippo<br /> Hon. J.P. Stadtmueller<br /> Donald J. Wall </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>President’s Council</b><br /> William J. Mulligan<br /> Kathleen S. Donius<br /> Daniel T. Flaherty<br /> Scott J. Campbell<br /> Robert L. Gegios<br /> Kathy L. Nusslock<br /> Cristina D. Hernandez </p> <br /> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Committee Chairs</b> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Bankruptcy</b><br /> Bruce G. Arnold<br /> Peter C. Blain </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Civil</b><br /> Melinda Hein Bialzik<br /> Mark A. Peterson </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Criminal</b><br /> Christopher D. Donovan<br /> Jonathan H. Koenig </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Membership</b><br /> Mark A. Cameli </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Newsletter</b><br /> Laura Schulteis Kwaterski<br /> Julie P. Wilson </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <b>Pro Bono</b><br /> Jennifer C. Hong<br /> Maria L. Kreiter </p> <h3 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> </h3></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> <td valign="top"> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="732" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="5" cellpadding="5" width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000; text-align: center"> <a href="http://edwba.org/The-Docket-March-2012.html">If you are having problems viewing the contents of this newsletter, please click here.</a> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>Dale Ihlenfeldt:  A Man in Full</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Rusty Long and Len Leverson</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Dale Ihlenfeldt loved to learn.  He loved to teach.  And he loved lawyers. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Dale Elwood Ihlenfeldt served as a bankruptcy judge in the Eastern District of Wisconsin from 1966 to 1995.  He was born in his parents’ farmhouse in the Town of Two Creeks, north of Manitowoc, on August 22, 1919.  He grew up there and later, when his father became a school administrator in the Kenosha area, in the Town of Wilmot and in Kenosha.  He graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1940 with a degree in accounting.  After first registering as a conscientious objector, Dale enlisted in the Navy and served his country as a supply officer on the U.S.S. Henry W. Tucker.  After World War II, Dale attended law school at the University of Wisconsin, graduating in 1948.  He practiced law from 1948 to 1951 with the Milwaukee law firm of Bitker & Marshall. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> In 1950, Dale ran as a Democrat for the Wisconsin Assembly.  He lost.  In his autobiography (available at the federal courthouse library and at the archives at Golda Meir Library at UWM), Dale tells this story about his decision to run in that race.  Congressman Andy Biemiller offered Dale $100 if he would run.  Dale asked the Congressman’s secretary, Jeannie Vlasis – who later, as Jean Lucey, became Wisconsin’s First Lady – what he should do.  Her advice:  “Get the money first.” </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Dale speculated that if he had won that race, he probably would never have become a bankruptcy judge.  We are all fortunate that he lost. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Most of us who came to know Judge Ihlenfeldt knew him as a bankruptcy judge, but he was a member of what Judge Pam Pepper has called our federal courthouse family well before he became a “referee in bankruptcy” – what bankruptcy judges were called in 1966, when Dale was first appointed.  Dale first went to work at 517 East Wisconsin Avenue as a law clerk for District Judge Robert Tehan. He served as Judge Tehan’s law clerk from 1951 to 1955, when Judge Tehan recommended his appointment as Clerk of the District Court.  Judge Tehan was later instrumental in Dale’s appointment as referee in bankruptcy. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Judge Tehan was a mentor to Dale Ihlenfeldt, as Dale was to be to many young lawyers and others.  They shared the same politics, in an era when Democrats were a distinct minority in a state long dominated by Republicans.  Dale was an invaluable helpmate to Judge Tehan – chauffeur, confidant, as well as law clerk.  When Judge Tehan retired, he arranged for Dale’s chambers to inherit his beaten-up green leather couch.  That couch became the seat of honor in innumerable conferences in Judge Ihlenfeldt’s chambers.  And, when Judge Ihlenfeldt finally retired, for real, at the end of 1995, Andy Herbach and Judge Jim Shapiro went through hoops with the General Services Administration to figure out how to buy the couch for Judge Ihlenfeldt.  This required, Judge Shapiro tells us, the posting of a notice in the bankruptcy clerk’s office (size and conspicuousness not specified). </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> In retirement, in addition to authoring his own autobiography, Judge Ihlenfeldt wrote a biography of his mentor, Judge Tehan. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Mentoring others was a characteristic of Dale Ihlenfeldt’s career.  Having been Clerk of the District Court, Dale took a particular interest in and protective fondness for the personnel of the Bankruptcy Court clerk’s office.  He secured the appointment of Betty Small, the first African-American clerk of the Eastern District Bankruptcy Court, and encouraged her to hire capable minority employees.  He is fondly remembered by many current and former members of the clerk’s office staff for his generosity in bringing Door County cherries and apples, Walworth County strawberries, wieners from Konop’s Meat Market in Stangelville, and kringle from Racine whenever he returned from hearing cases outside Milwaukee. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Judge Ihlenfeldt was a mentor to lawyers, as well.  He read every bankruptcy decision that was reported – a slightly (but only slightly) less onerous task than it would be today – and wrote up summaries of those he felt were important, which he kept in a notebook.  He began most discussions of contested matters by conducting off-the-record chambers conferences with counsel, referring to the cases in his notebook he felt were on point, and what his initial views were.  He reserved the right to change those views after hearing the evidence.  But most of the time his proactive technique led counsel to settle their cases – and they usually learned something, too. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Judge Ihlenfeldt was happy to share his knowledge, and the contents of that notebook, with anyone who asked.   The cases compiled in the notebook became the basis for Judge Ihlenfeldt’s “Annual Case Law Update,” which he delivered for many years, even after his 1995 retirement, at the State Bar’s Annual Bankruptcy Update in Milwaukee and Madison and other continuing legal education seminars.  Invariably this segment of the program got the best reviews. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> His mentoring went beyond teaching case law.  Bruce Lanser recalls the Judge teaching him that our children – Dale and his beloved wife Ellie had seven of them – are not ours, but only on loan from God.  Judge Ihlenfeldt was approachable; he commiserated when a lawyer faced a professional disappointment. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Judge Ihlenfeldt was a mentor to other bankruptcy judges, as well.  He took senior status in 1986 (serving thereafter as a “recalled annuitant”) to open up a bankruptcy judgeship in the hope a woman judge would be appointed.  He believed it was high time for women to be appointed to the bench.  Margaret Dee McGarity was appointed to fill Judge Ihlenfeldt’s judgeship.  Today, of course, we have three women bankruptcy judges in Milwaukee.  Judge Ihlenfeldt was also an advocate for the appointment of others who have graced our bankruptcy bench. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> By nature, and, with seven children, of necessity, Dale Ihlenfeldt was thrifty.  It was the Judge’s practice, when travelling to Green Bay overnight, to stay at the YMCA.  When his first law clerk (a coauthor of this article) objected to this plan, the two of them splurged – on one hotel room, having one bed.  Rusty and the Judge shared the bed.  When the Judge and his family traveled on vacation, they took their station wagon, and, frequently, Ellie’s mother or Dale’s mother, Grandma Esther, as well. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Judge Ihlenfeldt was a patient man.  His son Tom recalls that one of the very few times he ever saw his father angry was when they were driving through Amish country in that same station wagon, and a few of the kids made fun of the clothes the Amish were wearing.  The kids learned not to make fun. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Dale Ihlenfeldt took particular pleasure in the company of lawyers, and was not shy about saying so.  At a speech he gave in 1986 at the Milwaukee Bar Association’s Annual Memorial Service, Dale had this to say: </p> <blockquote> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> By and large, the lawyers I have known, young and old, men and women, of whatever color, have with few exceptions been intelligent, friendly, honest,<br /> conscientious, pragmatic, with a sense of humor and a gift of laughter.  We are brothers, sisters, partners in the calling and since my law school days I have<br /> felt blessed by my friendship with them. </p> </blockquote> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Dale Ihlenfeldt died on December 28, 2011, at the age of 92.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> In the General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, Chaucer introduces, among others, the Clerk.  Because Dale was the Clerk here, and for other reasons, the tale seems most apt.  We have changed one word and added one: </p> <blockquote> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> A clerk from Milwaukee was with us also,<br /> Who’d turned to getting knowledge, long ago.<br /> As meager was his horse as a rake,<br /> Nor he himself too fat, I’ll undertake.<br /> But he looked hollow and went soberly;<br /> Right threadbare was his corduroy overcoat, for he<br /> Had got him yet no churchly benefice,<br /> Nor was so worldly as to gain office.<br /> For he would rather have at his bed’s head<br /> Some twenty books, all bound in black and red,<br /> Of Aristotle and his philosophy,<br /> Than rich robes, fiddle, or gay psaltery.<br /> Yet, and for all he was philosopher,<br /> He had but little gold within his coffer;<br /> But all that he might borrow from a friend<br /> On books and learning he would swiftly spend,<br /> And then he’d pray right hastily for the souls<br /> Of those who gave him wherewithal for schools.<br /> Of study took he utmost care and heed.<br /> Not one word spoke he more than was his need,<br /> And that was said in fullest reverence, <br /> And short and quick and full of high good sense.<br /> Pregnant of moral virtue was his speech,<br /> And gladly would he learn, and gladly teach. </p> </blockquote> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>Annual Meeting in Review<br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 18px">Track 1:  Federal Receiverships as an Alternative to Chapter 11</span></b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Laura D. Steele</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Court decisions made in the wake of the financial fallout are revealing the use of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 66, which governs federal receivers, as a possible alternative to Chapter 11 reorganizations and Section 128 state receiverships.  The Bankruptcy Panel at the Eastern District Bar Association Meeting, led by Ryan S. Stippich, Jeffrey J. Liotta, and Bruce G. Arnold, noted that important Rule 66 decisions made in the Eastern District of Wisconsin and the Seventh Circuit are on par with newsworthy securities receivership cases such as Madoff and Stanford Financial Group.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Rule 66 authorizes federal district courts to appoint receivers in cases arising from the violation of federal laws.  Secured creditors may also invoke Rule 66 by satisfying diversity jurisdiction requirements under 11 U.S.C. § 1332.  Ultimately, the appointment of a federal receiver is regarded as an extraordinary remedy within the discretion of the court.  Rule 66 protects a plaintiff’s interest in property, particularly where there is evidence of fraudulent conduct or inadequate legal remedies, by empowering the federal receiver to clawback fraudulent transfers, sell assets, sue, and propose a plan of distribution.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Despite the broad powers available under the Rule, the panel remarked on its brevity—coincidentally only 66 words long—and the limited guidance available for practitioners, courts, and receivers.  The Rule’s terseness  and the lack of secondary resources means that Rule 66 proceedings are often fact-specific and governed largely by the court’s discretion.  While this gives parties leverage to propose applicable law and procedures to the court, the panel observed that Rule 66 proceedings are not entirely the “wild, wild west.”  Rather, courts frequently apply legal and equitable principles found within the Bankruptcy Code and state receivership statutes.    </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The panel discussed the case of <i>Wealth Management LLC</i> as a recent example of how courts in this district have applied bankruptcy principles to a Rule 66 case.  In <i>Wealth Management</i>, private hedge funds managed by an Appleton investment firm failed.  The SEC investigated and alleged myriad securities law violations.  Upon the SEC’s request, U.S. District Court Judge Griesbach appointed a Rule 66 receiver to formulate a plan of asset distribution for the failed company.  The plan treated investors, many of whom requested redemption prior to the receiver’s appointment, as equity holders rather than creditors.  Assets were then distributed on a<i> pro rata</i> basis of each investor’s net cash invested, without priority for redeeming investors—in essence, applying the bankruptcy principle of equitable subordination under 11 U.S.C. § 510.  Over the objection of redeeming investors, the Seventh Circuit affirmed approval of the distribution plan, deeming the plan “fair and equitable.”  <i>SEC v. Wealth Mgmt. LLC</i>, 628 F.3d 323 (7th Cir. 2010).  <i>See also Feinstein v. Long</i>, No. 11-C-57, 2011 WL 3555727 (E.D. Wis. Aug. 11, 2011) (contrasting <i>Scholes v. Schroeder</i>, 744 F. Supp. 1419 (N.D. Ill. 1990)). </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> At the conclusion of the discussion, audience members asked the panel whether a Rule 66 case could be heard by the Bankruptcy Court.  While the panel noted Rule 66 proceedings take place in District Court, it may be appropriate for the District Court to refer such a case to the Bankruptcy Court given its particular expertise in deciding equitable matters, or alternatively, to sit in tandem with a Bankruptcy Court to hear certain matters. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b> <span style="font-size: 18px">Track Two: <i>Twombly</i> Five Years Later: An Overview of the Impact of <i>Twombly</i> and <i>Iqbal</i></span></b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Laura L. Cronin</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> During Track Two, Attorney Cristina D. Hernandez moderated a session entitled <i>Twombly</i> Five Years Later: An Overview of the Impact of <i>Twombly</i> and <i>Iqbal</i>. On the panel were United States District Judge William C. Griesbach; Sandra Gegios, Law Clerk to United States District Judge Rudolph T. Randa; Attorney Scott W. Hansen of Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren S.C., and Attorney Robert K. O’Reilly of Ademi & O’Reilly LLP. The session began with an overview of <i>Twombly</i> and <i>Iqbal</i>, including a history of the pleading standard under <i>Conley</i>. The panel noted that the vagueness and uncertainty of the pleading standard laid out in <i>Twombly</i> and <i>Iqbal</i> prevent them from achieving the goals they were meant to achieve, such as minimizing litigation costs. The issue of whether the <i>Twombly</i> and <i>Iqbal</i> standard applies to the pleading of affirmative defenses was also discussed. The session ended with a discussion of the practical implications of the heightened pleading standard, such as plaintiffs needing to “beef up” complaints and state court practitioners needing to conform their pleadings to the heightened federal standard in cases removed from state court. The attendees were also provided with useful materials, including a paper authored by Attorney Hansen and his colleague Attorney Alexander B. Handelsman on <i>Twombly</i> and <i>Iqbal</i>. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b> <span style="font-size: 18px">Track Three:<i> Jones</i> and the Future of the Fourth Amendment</span></b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Stephanie Quick</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> For the criminal law breakout session, Judge Diane S. Sykes, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit Court, moderated a panel discussion on the recent Supreme Court decision in <i>United States v. Jones </i>and the future of the Fourth Amendment. Panelists included United States Magistrate Judge Aaron E. Goodstein, Daniel D. Blinka of Marquette University Law School, John J. Manning of the U.S. Attorney’s Office, and Dean A. Strang of Hurley, Burish & Stanton. The session began with an overview of the facts, as well as the key points from each of the three opinions filed in the case. The discussion included whether <i>Jones </i>could have been classified as a seizure case rather than a search case, whether <i>Jones </i>clarified the legal standard for GPS tracking, and how <i>Jones</i> impacts the relationship between property rights and the <i>Katz</i> reasonable expectation of privacy test in Fourth Amendment jurisprudence. The panel also discussed how the <i>Katz</i> reasonable expectation of privacy test may change with emerging technology. Finally, panel members noted how GPS tracking is only one tool for law enforcement to gather evidence and practitioners should be aware of the various legal standards governing the use of different tools. Attendees were provided with several handouts, including a copy of the <i>Jones</i> case, an outline of the various opinions in the case, an article from The New York Times on cell phone tracking as a tool for law enforcement, and a list of resources for further reading. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>New EDWBA Officers and Board Members</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> New officers of the bar association were announced during the luncheon at the annual meeting.  New officers, whose terms begin June 15, include: </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> President:  Allen C. Schlinsog, Jr., Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren<br /> President Elect:  Tony S. Baish, Godfrey & Kahn<br /> Vice President:  Jonathan H. Koenig, U.S. Attorney’s Office<br /> Secretary:  Sandra R. Gegios, U.S. District Court<br /> Treasurer:  T. Wickham Schmidt, Liebmann, Conway, Olejniczak & Jerry </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Six new board members were also announced.  They include: </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Craig W. Albee, Federal Defender Services of Wisconsin<br /> Donald A. Daugherty, Jr., Whyte Hirschboeck Dudek<br /> Christopher D. Donovan, Pruhs & Donovan<br /> Michelle L. Jacobs, Michael Best & Friedrich<br /> Katherine Maloney Perhach, Quarles & Brady<br /> Hon. Nelson W. Phillips III, Milwaukee County Circuit Court </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>Farewell to a Trailblazer – U.S. Magistrate Ruth W. LaFave</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Rufino Gaytán III</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> U.S. Magistrate Ruth LaFave was truly a woman ahead of her time.  She broke through barriers few women of her day dreamed possible, leaving behind an inspiring legacy of social justice and compassion. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Magistrate LaFave met her husband, Lloyd LaFave, as an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  The young couple attended the University of Wisconsin Law School together, all the while sharing a set of law books.  According to her son, John LaFave, who serves as Register of Deeds for Milwaukee County, Magistrate LaFave had a hard time sharing – Mr. LaFave often struggled to get his studies done because she would study incessantly.  It’s no wonder that Lloyd LaFave referred to her as “the smart one.”  When she graduated from law school in 1945, Ruth LaFave was one of four women in her class. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> After a short stint in private practice with her husband, Magistrate LaFave experienced several rejections from Milwaukee law firms because they simply did not hire women.  Undeterred by the discriminatory reality of the time, Magistrate LaFave went on to become the Clerk of Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin in 1967.  At that time, only six other women across the country served as clerks of federal courts. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> In 1970, Ruth LaFave took on part-time duties as a U.S. Magistrate for the Eastern District of Wisconsin while maintaining her role as Clerk of Court.  Back then, the role of a Magistrate was fairly limited, as the Federal Magistrates Act, which created the position, was only two years old.  In 1990, Congress amended the Act to change the position’s formal title to U.S. Magistrate Judge.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> As the role of Magistrates evolved, Ruth LaFave took on additional judicial duties, including overseeing pretrial hearings, ruling on pretrial motions and setting bail in certain criminal cases.  Eventually, the Court tasked Magistrate LaFave with screening prisoner cases.  In this role, Magistrate LaFave saw prisoners file complaints alleging violations of their civil rights.  By 1979, Magistrate LaFave regularly assisted Judge Aaron Goodstein, who was then the full-time Magistrate, with criminal intake proceedings. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> In particular, Magistrate LaFave assisted with petty offenses that occurred in federal enclaves, such as the Veterans Affairs Hospital. These cases were typically resolved in hearings (mini-trials) held before Magistrates.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Judge Goodstein recalls one of Magistrate LaFave’s cases in which a veteran was charged with being intoxicated at the VA Hospital.  Following this hearing, Judge Goodstein took the bench for a separate case, when he soon realized that Magistrate LaFave left all of her case’s exhibits – vodka bottles confiscated from the veteran – on the bench and in plain sight.  Given the numerous responsibilities Magistrate LaFave had on any given day, it is not surprising that something like this was overlooked.  Nevertheless, Judge Goodstein had a tough time explaining the “exhibits” to the litigants already waiting for him in his courtroom. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> In what was likely her most publicized case, Magistrate LaFave presided over a dispute between the Milwaukee Public Schools and parents of North Division High School students, who were predominantly African-American.  The legal fight involved the school board’s decision to transform North Division High School into a city-wide magnet school.  African-American residents fought the plan, essentially fighting against the school board’s desegregation efforts, because the plan would have displaced many African-American students.  The case eventually settled after the school board decided to abandon its initial plan. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Magistrate LaFave always took an interest in civil rights and equality.  While an undergraduate and law student in Madison, she actively participated in the Madison Chapter of the NAACP.  She also remained active in the League of Women Voters and often worked as a poll worker. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> When she retired in 1983, Magistrate LaFave admitted to a Milwaukee Sentinel reporter that she felt sorry for some of the prisoners she saw in court.  She also expressed concern for individuals who were denied social security benefits but could not afford legal representation to challenge those denials.  True to her belief that everyone deserved equal treatment under the law, Magistrate LaFave even considered continuing to practice law as a private attorney after retiring from the bench. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> While she never actually practiced law again, Magistrate LaFave did more than her fair share in advancing civil rights and equality for the people of Wisconsin.  With her passing, the people of this state, and especially the Wisconsin legal community, have lost a great source of pride and inspiration and a true believer in equal justice. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000">Impressive Performances — Law Day Civics Bowl</h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Sandra R. Gegios</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> On Law Day, May 1, 2012, high school students from the Hmong Peace Academy, the New School for Community Service, and the Washington High School for Information and Technology participated in the First Annual Law Day Civics Bowl presented by the Kids, Courts, & Citizenship (“KCC”), a program of the District Court and the EDWBA.  All of the students had previously engaged in the KCC educational program developed by United States Magistrate Judges Patricia J. Gorence and Nancy Joseph, with assistance from other employees of federal entities throughout the courthouse as well as EDWBA volunteers.<br />             <br /> Magistrate Judges William E. Callahan, Aaron E. Goodstein, and Nancy Joseph presided over the midday competition that was held in the ornately carved oak-paneled Ceremonial Courtroom of the Federal Courthouse in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. EDWBA President Matt O’Neill, serving as the master of ceremonies, broke the palpable tension in the solemn historic courtroom by comparing the competition to that of <i>The Hunger Games</i>, a popular young adult book series and film. He advised the students that, unlike <i>The Hunger Games</i> where only the victor survives, all of them would be able to leave the forum.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The courtroom quieted as, one by one, the student team members advanced to the podium responding to a question posed by one of the panel judges. The students, who had prepared for the bowl by studying the citizenship examination that applicants for United States citizenship must pass, excelled in answering the questions. Some students responded with the answer immediately after the judge articulated the final word of the question. After seven minutes of fast-paced questioning, only two students were unable to provide the correct answer to the question posed.   The audience of classmates, teachers, and courthouse employees were visibly awed and impressed by the participants’ pose and demonstrated acumen.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The questions varied from the specific – such as – please provide the year that the United States Constitution was signed; please name one of the two longest rivers in the United States; and, please name all nine United States Supreme Court justices to more abstract questions – such as – “please tell me what Martin Luther King did” or “please tell me two ways that a citizen can participate in our democracy?” So well versed were the students that the judges administered all the prepared questions without eliminating a significant number of the contestants. The judges resorted to reformulating the questions to elicit additional information. For example, an earlier question asked for the names of three of the original colonies. The reformulated question asked for the names of all thirteen original colonies. Another reformulated question asked for the names of three Native-American tribes, in addition to the six other tribes previously named by two other civics bowl participants.    </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> After determining that the New School was in third place, and there was a tie for first place between the Hmong Peace Academy and Washington High School, the judges asked each of the tied schools to select a team member to continue to compete. The questioning of the two students continued – with questions volleying back and forth with the rapidity of a ping-pong game. The competitors were so capable that the judges were unable to eliminate one of them.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Concluding that the tie could not be broken within the allotted time, the judges awarded bronze medals to each member of the New School team. They also awarded individual gold medals to each Hmong Peace Academy and Washington High School contestant. A participating judge personally placed the medal on each student and clasped hands with the student offering congratulations.  In addition, the judges presented Washington School with an extremely large gold cup mounted on a substantial pedestal. (Hockey followers are advised that the cup was not as immense as the Stanley Cup).  The Hmong Peace Academy will also be presented with an identical gold cup. Magistrate Judge Joseph closed the competition with an appropriate acknowledgment of the hard work of many individuals, including the invaluable assistance, support, and dedication of the teachers who served as team coaches.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> The competition was a tremendous success, with impressive performances by all competitors.  The Civics Bowl will provide an excellent foundation for future KCC Law Day activities. It is also a step in the EDWBA’s efforts to emphasize the importance of the rule of law, civil awareness, and participation in our democratic society to young students. The joint efforts of the district court and the EDWBA continue with planning that is underway for a 2012 Constitution Day program. Save the September 17, 2012, date and/or contact Katy Borowski or any EDWBA officer or board member if you would like to assist with the program. </p> <table width="100%" border="0" cellspacing="5" cellpadding="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012summer/IMG_3261.jpg" width="220" height="146" alt="edwba" /></td> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012summer/IMG_3273.jpg" width="220" height="146" alt="edwba" /></td> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012summer/IMG_3287.jpg" width="220" height="146" alt="edwba" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012summer/IMG_3270.jpg" width="220" height="146" alt="edwba" /></td> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012summer/IMG_3293.jpg" width="220" height="146" alt="edwba" /></td> <td align="center" valign="top"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/2012summer/IMG_3301.jpg" width="220" height="146" alt="edwba" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>Members Launch Website</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <i>Christopher D. Donovan</i> </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> Marquette Law Professor Michael O'Hear, along with EDWBA members Amelia Bizzaro, Tony Cotton, Josh Uller, and Chris Donovan, have started a website devoted to providing daily summary and analysis of every criminal case decision published by the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals. The website is located at <a href="http://www.seventhcircuitcases.com/" target="_blank">http://www.seventhcircuitcases.com/</a>, and the authors hope this may be a valuable resource for members of the EDWBA and they welcome any and all feedback. </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> <div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000"> <h2 style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 22px; color: #000000"><b>EDWBA Membership Renewal</b></h2> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> It is that time of year – time to renew your membership with the Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association.  Soon you will receive a dues renewal invoice in the mail.  As you are reviewing the invoice, please update your contact information, if applicable, and please consider joining one of the committees.  If you have colleagues who are not members, please encourage them to join.  An application can be found on the website (<a href="http://www.edwba.org">www.edwba.org</a>) or you may contact Katy Borowski (<script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy22964 = 'kborowski' + '@'; addy22964 = addy22964 + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; var addy_text22964 = 'kborowski' + '@' + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy22964 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text22964); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script>) to receive an electronic copy of the membership application.  </p> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000">   </p> </div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: #000000"> <span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association<br /> <a href="http://edwba.org">www.edwba.org</a><br /> 424 East Wells Street<br /> Milwaukee, WI 53202</span> </p> </td> <td align="center"> <p align="right"> <span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Executive Director<br /> Katy Borowski<br /> 414-276-5933<br /> <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy5546 = 'kborowski' + '@'; addy5546 = addy5546 + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; var addy_text5546 = 'kborowski' + '@' + 'milwbar' + '.' + 'org'; document.write('<a ' + path + '\'' + prefix + ':' + addy5546 + '\'>'); document.write(addy_text5546); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n </script><script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('<span style=\'display: none;\'>'); //--> </script>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. <script type='text/javascript'> <!-- document.write('</'); document.write('span>'); //--> </script></span> </p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" align="center" valign="middle" style="background-image: url('http://edwba.org/images/newsletter/newsletter_r7_c1.jpg')"><span style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">[UNSUBSCRIBE] [STATS]<br /> </span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <div class="item-separator"></div> </div> <div class="item column-2"> <h2> The Docket - March 2011 </h2> <div><a href="http://edwba.org/images/stories/newsletter/march2011/newsletter.pdf" target="_blank" title="The Docket - March 2011 (PDF)" class="jce_file"><img src="http://edwba.org/mambots/editors/jce/jscripts/tiny_mce/plugins/filemanager/images/ext/pdf_small.gif" title="pdf" alt="pdf" border="0" /> The Docket - March 2011 (PDF)<span style="font-size: 80%" class="jce_fm_size"> 1.87 Mb</span></a></div><div><br /><a href="http://edwba.org/images/stories/newsletter/march2011/newsletter.pdf" target="_blank" title="The Docket - March 2011 (PDF)" class="jce_file"><img src="http://edwba.org/images/stories/newsletter/march2011/thumbnails/thumb_newsletter_page_1.jpg" title="thumb_newsletter_page_1.jpg" style="float: left; margin: 5px" height="250" width="193" alt="thumb_newsletter_page_1.jpg" /><img src="http://edwba.org/images/stories/newsletter/march2011/thumbnails/thumb_newsletter_page_2.jpg" title="thumb_newsletter_page_2.jpg" style="float: left; margin: 5px" height="250" width="193" alt="thumb_newsletter_page_2.jpg" /><img src="http://edwba.org/images/stories/newsletter/march2011/thumbnails/thumb_newsletter_page_3.jpg" title="thumb_newsletter_page_3.jpg" style="float: left; margin: 5px" height="250" width="193" alt="thumb_newsletter_page_3.jpg" /><img src="http://edwba.org/images/stories/newsletter/march2011/thumbnails/thumb_newsletter_page_4.jpg" title="thumb_newsletter_page_4.jpg" style="float: left; margin: 5px" height="250" width="193" alt="thumb_newsletter_page_4.jpg" /><img src="http://edwba.org/images/stories/newsletter/march2011/thumbnails/thumb_newsletter_page_5.jpg" title="thumb_newsletter_page_5.jpg" style="float: left; margin: 5px" height="250" width="193" alt="thumb_newsletter_page_5.jpg" /></a></div> <div class="item-separator"></div> </div> <span class="row-separator"></span> </div> <div class="items-more"> <h3>More Articles...</h3> <ol> <li> <a href="/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=31:the-docket-november-2011&catid=9"> The Docket - November 2011</a> </li> <li> <a href="/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=32:july2011&catid=9"> The Docket - July 2011</a> </li> <li> <a href="/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=23:the-docket-january-2007&catid=9"> The Docket - January 2007</a> </li> <li> <a href="/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=19:the-docket-december-2008&catid=9"> The Docket - December 2008</a> </li> </ol> </div> </div> <br /> </td> </tr> </table></td> </tr> </table></td> </tr> <tr class="footer_top"> <td align="left"><table cellpadding="2" cellspacing="2" width="100%" class="footer"> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap">© 2017 Eastern District of Wisconsin Bar Association<br /> 424 East Wells Street • Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202<br /> (414) 276-5933 • (414) 274-6765</td> <td align="right" valign="middle" nowrap="nowrap"> <a class="footer" href="index.php?option=com_xmap&view=html&id=1" >Site Map </a></tr></table></td> </tr> </table> </body> <script>'undefined'=== typeof _trfq || (window._trfq = []);'undefined'=== typeof _trfd && (window._trfd=[]),_trfd.push({'tccl.baseHost':'secureserver.net'}),_trfd.push({'ap':'cpsh'},{'server':'a2plcpnl0124'}) // Monitoring performance to make your website faster. 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